Song By Song: The Minstrel Boy

Author’s Note: Okay. I’m sorry. When I said that this would be bi-weekly, I meant barring thunderstorms that knock out power, family coming, cleaning and other things that get in the way of writing. Please accept my apologies and don’t mention it again. My feelings would be hurt otherwise. Okay, before we get to the good stuff (my opinions), do you know of any really good resources that detail the histories of Celtic songs? I’d love more scholarly efforts than … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

New Blog: Song By Song

Okay, everyone imagine you are a socially awkward, introverted (we no longer say shy, because it’s not cool anymore), slightly mysophobic young lady. Got it? Now imagine you are at a Ren Faire. Okay now, pop quiz time: What is the worst thing that can happen to you there? Is it?  A) Get a lap dance from a man in a kilt. B) You buy a band’s CD from a girl in corset who was never actually on stage with … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: The Snake by Shane MacGowan and The Popes

There are precious few styles of Celtic that I don’t like, and infinitely more that I enjoy.  I like all the usual stuff, beautiful lilting voices, traditional instruments and in short the works. But what really seems to me to be the heart of Celtic is angry men singing about women, beer and rebelling against the British. And Lord have mercy on “The Snake” Shane MacGowan delivers that, and in the best way possible. It is a high-powered, eclectic effort … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “Live Out Loud” By Maidens IV

I’m excited about this review because this is the first one I’ve ever done about a group that I’ve actually heard of before. Maidens IV have graced these pages many times before, and I first heard them on the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast. It’s difficult to say anything about them that hasn’t be said before. Maidens IV is made up of four formerly homeschooled sisters who are so talented in their music that I half suspect some midnight deal … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

“Sons of Malarkey” by Sons of Malarkey

  Hailing from Scappoose, OR, (Big shout out to Scappoose, my dad’s hometown), Sons of Malarkey is a fun blend of Celtic and rock and a little of everything else. I’m honestly not sure how to classify what they do, but I know that I do like it. It’s a high energy album that carries you along, but does it without ever being overwhelming. One thing that sets this album apart from other albums is its fine mix of songs. … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Old Dirt Road by Lexington Field

As soon as I got Old Dirt Road by Lexington Field, and I started to read their website, I may have (though I’m not saying I did) sighed when I saw that they bill themselves as a high-energy live show. A good rule of thumb is if someone says that they deliver a high-energy show, then they are probably terrible at bringing that energy to a studio. That is not one of Lexington Field’s problems, in fact if anything the … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

“Honk Toot Suite” by Éamonn Coyne and Kris Drever

  With a title like Honk Toot Suite,  I had absolutely no idea what to expect from the album by Éamonn Coyne and Kris Drever.  Reading Coyne is a banjo player was a bit worrying to me.  A banjo is a like a signal that bluegrass is about to be perpetrated; worse yet yodeling  is threatened.  I do not think there is anything kind I could say about yodeling.  However, on hearing it, I knew I really shouldn’t have worried. … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “Waves On The Shore” by Emily Kellam

With an extraordinary voice, and equally extraordinary lyrics, Emily Kellam has made one of the best albums that I’ve heard in a long time. Her love of Celtic mythology, and her involvement in The Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) have led her to write songs that draw  from  those two sources. While I’m not a member of the SCA, and thus much of the things that are obvious to them aren’t to me, I vastly enjoyed it because with this … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “Hair of the Frog” by Three Weird Sisters

Harpist Gwen Knighton, Teresa Powell on the upright bass, and Brenda Sutton on guitar and percussion, make up the The Three Weird Sisters on these recordings. The trio are the best sort of folk group:  the kind who do whatever they want musically rather than being completely locked in to any one style. With nary a traditional song in sight, they bring to the table smart writing, bright harmonies and a sense of humor. With eighteen songs and a hour’s … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “Celtic Squall” by Celtic Squall

Artist: Celtic Squall Album: Celtic Squall In this, their first album, Celtic Squall gives an impressive performance. Formed by Heather Greene, and her husband Stu Venable, whose other bands’ (The Merry Wives of Windsor and The Poxy Boggards, respectively) styles didn’t leave them much room to perform small-group traditional Celtic music. Greene does an admirable job on the recorder and Venable does equally well on the electric and upright bass. In addition to Greene and Venable are Claire Broderick on … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.