About Graham Bradley

Graham Bradley primarily reviews fiction and other books on his main blog, GrahamChops.blogspot.com, and is also a contributor to the Celtic MP3s online magazine.

“Six Yanks” by Barleyjuice

Known for their boisterous renditions of “All For Me Grog” and “Whiskey in the Jar,” Barleyjuice’s third album (2006) comes out swinging and doesn’t stop. Sure, the first track “Misty Mornings Miss’d” is a bit of a warm-up–a kind of teasing mellow instrumental that says “Hey, we can do chill stuff too, lads,” right before reminding you where they came from with “Pretty Wild Bride” and “Modern Pirates.” And if you want an ear-opener that begs a second listen, try … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

“Prairie Rain” by Brian Thomas

You’d be hard-pressed to come up with a more apt title for this remarkably soothing instrumental album by Canadian musician Brian Thomas. Each track is labeled with names like “Cool Grey Morning,” “The Irish Coast” and “Iona Sunset,” evoking not only images of nature but also the emotions that accompany them. Thomas has succeeded in capturing that emotion and transmitting it to the listener with his music. A particular favorite is “The Wind and Waves,” an uppity demonstration on the … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “Hooligans and Saints” by Charm City Saints

If the Dropkick Murphys had stayed underground and never attached their music to a Dave Mirra game, they’d look a lot like the Charm City Saints. They’re a boon to the Indy Irish Punk genre, and this album from 2009 is a great part of their lineup. It starts with a pretty mellow tune called “Egan’s Polka,” then wastes no time burning the house down with “The Night Pat Murphy Died” and “My Last Goodbyes.” Like any good album it … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “Luna Wings” by Arlene Faith

If this album demonstrates one thing, it’s Arlene Faith’s potent ability to conjure up a wide range of emotions with Celtic instrumentals. Where many other albums of its kind tend to have twelve of the “same” track, Luna Wings strikes melancholy chords with different tempos, and not a single track falls flat. Some of the more uppity tracks, like “Jack in the Pulpit” and “Pixie Dust” conjure up a spirit of contentment, while the more serious tones of “Eclipse” and … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “The Seas are Deep” by The Pedrick-Hutson Guitar Duo

David Pedrick and Jeremy Hutson bring their talents to the Irish music scene in this album, one of many they’ve released over the past decade. They stay true to their established Classical style, while adapting the harp music of Turlough O’Carolan to the guitar. Originally released in 2006, “The Seas are Deep” is a mellow collection of duets on guitar. These soft arrangements are soothing to the ear, from “Lady Rose Dillon” to “Blind Mary.” The artists chose a selection … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “Eire Ceol–Songs from the Drunk Tank” by The Wildcelts

While this album from the rowdy Wildcelts has been around for a few years, it definitely hasn’t worn out its welcome. It’s rowdy, energetic, and contains a smooth combination of instruments and vocals. Their style feels the same as some mainstream bands (Flogging Molly, Dropkick Murphys, etc) without directly copying or emulating. It’s a modern feel of an established style, Irish music that today’s alternative rock fans can really enjoy. Some of the songs, like “Johnny Give it Up” have … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “Mystical Moments, A Sign of Things To Come” by Jacie McConnell

Artist: Jacie McConnell Album: Mystical Moments, A Sign of Things To Come Jacie McConnell’s “Mystical Moments” is more than just a collection of Celtic-inspired instrumentals. The artist takes the listener on a trip to the long-lost land of the Fae called Tir N’an Nog, using music as the preferred method of transport. In the same style as the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, McConnell begins with a narrative before launching into the opening theme, and then progresses into an interesting blend of instrumental … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.

Review: “Éist” by TJ Hull and Jeff Ksiazek

Artist: TJ Hull and Jeff Ksiazek Album: Éist “Éist” is a collection of 12 very well-done jigs and reels in the Irish tradition. From the opening “Sergeant Early’s Dream/ Paddy Fahey’s” to the finale with “Salamanca/ O’Dowd’s Favourite,” Hull and Ksiazek start with an uppity tempo and slowly ease into a buffet of ear candy. Variation is a great strength on this album, as no two tempos really find themselves back to back. If the fiddle gets excited, the strings keep … Continue reading

You are invited to use any or all of these articles on the Celtic Music Magazine in your publication or website. The only requirement is that you include the by-line of the author including the name, website, and an active link to the Celtic Music Magazine at www.celticmp3s.com.